Eric Clapton, Roger Waters, Steve Winwood & More Honor Ginger Baker In London

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Eric Clapton, Roger Waters, Steve Winwood and Ronnie Wood were among the musicians who participated in “A Tribute To Ginger Baker.” The concert held in honor of the late Cream/Blind Faith drummer took place at Eventim Apollo Hammersmith in London on Monday night.

Clapton led a house band that also included keyboardist/vocalist Paul Carrack, keyboardist Chris Stainton, drummers Sonny Emory and Steve Gadd, bassist Willie Weeks and vocalists Katie Kissoon and Sharon White. Pink Floyd bassist Roger Waters was the first guest of the night as he added to the opening run of “Sunshine Of Your Love,” “Strange Brew” and “White Room.” The latter also featured Ronnie Wood and Kenney Jones.

Next up was “I Feel Free” sung by Carrack featuring Nile Rodgers and “Tales Of Brave Ulysses” with the same lineup. Guitarist Will Johns then emerged for “Sweet Wine” ahead of “Blue Condition.” The concert rolled on with Wood and Henry Spinetti adding to “Badge” and Ginger’s son Kofi Baker coming out for the rest of the night starting with “Pressed Rat.” Steve Winwood came aboard to augment the house band, Kofi and Nile on “Had To Cry Today,” “Presence Of The Lord,” “Well Alright,” “Can’t Find My Way Home” and “Do What You Like/Toad.” All of the evening’s performers added to a “Crossroads” encore/finale.

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Watch fan-shot video captured by banfibill from “A Tribute To Ginger Baker”:

Sunshine Of Your Love

White Room

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I Feel Free, Tales Of Brave Ulysses

Badge

Had To Cry Today

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Can’t Find My Way Home

Well Alright

Crossroads

Setlist

Eric Clapton at Eventim Apollo

  • Sunshine of Your Love  
  • Strange Brew  
  • White Room  
  • I Feel Free  
  • Tales of Brave Ulysses  
  • Sweet Wine  
  • Blue Condition  
  • Badge  
  • Pressed Rat and Wart Hog  
  • Had to Cry Today  
  • Presence of the Lord  
  • Can't Find My Way Home  
  • Well All Right  
  • Do What You Like / Toad  
Encore
  • Cross Road Blues
  • Robert Johnson