Friday Playlist: The Clash Covers

KNOW YOUR RIGHTS…ALL THREE OF THEM!

Known for a time as "The Only Band That Matters," The Clash in their short existence (1976-1982 with original lineup) did more to complicate and enliven rock than most bands could manage in decades. Only Creedence Clearwater Revival bests them for greatest influence for shortest amount of time together (1967-1972), and there's probably some who'd argue The Clash have had a wider impact on other bands. Mick Jones (vocals, lead guitar), Joe Strummer (vocals, rhythm guitar), Topper Headon (drums) and Paul Simonon (bass, vocals) showed that punk spirit could be wed to ferocious creativity with virtually no boundaries. Brash and political, they were also sensimilla loving dance floor hooligans who truly lived punk's ethos by following no one's rules but their own. As with most such inventive fires, they burned brightly but briefly, but their influence is scattered throughout music culture.

This week we offer you 13 interpretations of songs created by The Clash. This Playlist was prompted by a reader comment for last week's Beatles covers, so if you ever wondered if your input has an impact folks, well, here you go. There's a few things we'd have liked to share but weren't available on Lala (do yourselves a favor and seek out Josh Rouse's version of "Straight To Hell") but this should get your blood moving nicely as we dive into the weekend.

And check out last week's Playlist full of Beatles covers by Al Green, The Black Crowes, Yes and more!

Playlist assembled by JamBase Associate Editor Dennis Cook, whose been lost in the supermarket since he was 13-years-old and still misses Joe Strummer like he left us yesterday…

[Published on: 10/16/09]

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