Theodore
Theodore Justin - Voice, guitar, words, harmonica
Jason - Drums, percussion, glockenspiel, whistling, dobro, guitar, voice
JJ - Lap steel, guitar, electric and upright bass, voice, accordion, trombone, electronics, mandolin, harmonica, banjo, glockenspiel
Andy - Electric and upright bass, guitar, glockenspiel, trumpet, banjo, saw, keys, mandolin, voice

In 2006, Justin and Jason saw each other from across a room. Sparks flew. A song was playing. Next thing, they were playing songs. Then Justin and Jason met JJ, and he, too, started playing along with songs. This felt good, but something wasn't quite right. Where there could have, or should have been more sounds, there weren't. Then Justin remembered his old school chum/racquetball nemesis Andy. Andy said "let's do this" and then the game was really afoot. This was is in the early fall of 2006. Gears started grinding and the boys, finally a unit, began recording their debut full length, the record that would come to be called "Songs for the Weary" soon after. They worked all winter, toured a bit, and played around home. They put their record out in time for a big west coast tour, and things were going great. In Oregon their van died and the fellows were in despair. What will we do, they cried? Miraculously, out of the rabble of shysters appeared a white stallion, or a VW Eurovan. The boys saddled up again and snatched morale from the jaws of utter defeat. When they returned home their album was the toast of the town. After resting on their laurels for a few months the fellows hit St. Louis' Penny Studio to make a new record, called "Defeated, TN." Based upon a small collection of letters they found in an abandoned house in Tennessee, it attempts to document the disintegration of an American family faced with life's toils, troubles, temptations, and dangers. Maybe there's hope, maybe there's not. The boys aren't qualified to say. But one thing's for sure. The fellows of Theodore plan on putting out "Defeated, TN" on whatever dimes they can find, driving it 'round this great land of corn and sawdust, and then there are tracks to be laid down, always more tracks...