A Northern Chorus
A Northern Chorus A Northern Chorus - The millions too many A Northern Chorus is: Stuart Livingstone (guitar & vocals), Pete Hall (guitar &vocals), Alex McMaster (cello & vocals), Erin Aurich (violin), Owen Davies(bass), & Craig Halliday (percussion) There is something to be said about life under the mainstream radar. It lends a unique kind of freedom to the creative process. Granted, the constant financial struggle can feel like a huge weight sometimes, but then, that's not why we’re doing this. When we released 'Before we all go to pieces' back in 2001, we really had no expectations. It was simply a creative outlet. But the reviews came rushing in pretty quickly. Exclaim magazine even dubbed the album "a balanced musical epic". Since then, we've released two other critically acclaimed albums on Sonic Unyon Records, namely 'Spirit Flags' in 2003 and 'Bitter Hands Resign' in 2005. For the latter, Pitchfork Media said “A Northern Chorus has turned out the record that Death Cab for Cutie might make after taking an on online classical composition course and a near-fatal overdose of tranquilizer cocktails.” While Harp Magazine said “Ontario’s A Northern Chorus looks for order in music. Meticulously ethereal, the band’s third album contrasts with the existential tumult that lies within." Over the last 5 years we've toured the continent several times, and have even crossed the pond for a small tour of the UK. We've steadily gained popularity in North America, and are anxious to do the same overseas. Our new album 'The millions too many' was recorded at the same rural location as 'Bitter Hands Resign'. With our friend and co-producer Graham Walsh at the helm, this album marks the return of violinist Erin Aurich and the addition of Craig Halliday behind the drum kit. This is also the first record to feature the talents of the one-man-horn-section, Ben Bowen. The songs on this new record are decidedly different than our previous works. We realized early on in the writing process that this album was going to be something different. The most notable change being a departure from the slower tempos and longer songs. With seven of nine songs clocking in around four minutes, die-hard fans might think we've crossed over to the darker side of the music industry. All that being said, we're still A Northern Chorus and 'The millions too many' still sounds like A Northern Chorus. The lyrics continue to be inspired by this under-the-radar endeavour, and are chalked full of anti-deterministic sentiment. We're still wading through that fog of disparity and trying to maintain a clear sense of immediacy. Hopefully, 'The millions too many' points towards minimizing the excesses of this world and bridging the gaps between us.