Balkan Beat Box
Balkan Beat Box Recorded primarily at Tel Aviv’s Vibromonk East studio, Balkan Beat Box's new album "Give" was conceived of as “a smaller, more introverted album,” according to Ori Kaplan. “It was fun for us to see what just came out of the three of us while we played with old analog synths and children’s toys”.

Brimming over with handcrafted beats and samples, Give yields up BBB’s the most textured sonic palette of their career. “This is our most hardcore album so far,” says Tamir Muskat. “Definitely musically – there’s more of a harder-edged, electronic sound. The songs and their subjects are also kind of darker and more political.”

“It was just the three of us in the studio this time,” says frontman Tomer Yosef. “No guests, just us, and I think that concentrated our sound like never before.”

Inspired by last year’s people’s protest movements across the globe – from the Arab Spring, to Occupy Wall St., to Israel’s own massive social protests Give captures the cautious hope and re-energized spirit of our time. This spirit is apparent on songs like “Political Fuck” and “Enemy In Economy”, which tells the true story of Tomer’s detention by TSA authorities after being mistaken for a terrorist on an Alaska Airlines flight.

BBB’s passion burns brightest in one particular suite of songs – “Money”, “Minimal”, “Porno Clown” and “Look Like You” – which introduce a character that Ori calls the “fantasy man”. A stereotypical “big shot capitalist” on a collision course with insanity thanks to his empty materialist values.

One of the other animating forces on Give is fatherhood – all three members have become fathers since the recording of their last album, and Tomer explains how that influenced the band’s outlook: “When you have kids, you become a little more aware of what’s happening in the world and what kind of world that we’re leaving your kids. “

“It was kind of a crazy vibe in the studio sometimes,” Tamir laughs. “We were recording some of our most hardcore songs ever, but our kids would be there, too, running around and playing in the middle of everything. I think it gave things a hopeful vibe, too… it reminds us that we’re fighting for something, not just against everything.”