High on Fire: Changing the Game

By: Chris Pacifico

High On Fire
In the time of the Roman Empire, punishments for serious crimes included hacking off a limb (or one's nose) or being sealed in a bag with a wild animal, which was then tossed into river rapids. If ever a band epitomized these violent sensations it's High on Fire.

When singer-guitarist Matt Pike's previous outfit, Sleep - still regarded as the "ultimate stoner metal band" by many - disbanded in the late '90s, he had big shoes to fill. Sure enough, he came through with High On Fire. Born in 1999, his new band quickly proved to be a major entity in the heady SF Bay Area metal scene.

2000's The Art of Self Defense treaded creative waters but they hit their stride with the double blow of 2003's Surrounded by Thieves and 2005's Blessed Black Wings, which pushed metal forward with their sheer force and raw, scorched aesthetic. High On Fire puts the emphasis on riffs, a doom ethos and thundering rhythms, all led by Pike's unique touch that can make his guitar resonate like a snarling beast next to his broiled voice, which he keeps from breaking down on the road with an elixir of tea, hot water, honey, lemon and whiskey.

Each High on Fire album expresses different notions of sound and tactility. Where Blessed Black Wings was barbaric and primal, a band baring its teeth for a fast kill, their newest release, Death Is This Communion (released in September of 2007), is their most ardent long player to date.

"It's the best thing I've been on, that's for sure," says Pike. Communion is engorged with psychedelic flourishes and an exotic Ottoman thrust, likely due to new bassist Jeff Matz's taste for Turkish and Middle Eastern music. Pike calls it "more controlled and melodic." He and his bandmates wanted to give the listener a kick in the ass by more intricate means this time.

High on Fire's Matt Pike
"We wanted it to have more mood swings, move up and down and kind of jerk your emotions around as opposed to it all being like a wild animal right off the bat," says Pike. "We wanted to physiologically kind of fuck with people. Not fuck with people but you know what I'm saying, it's supposed to do something to you."

"Music is an ocean. It's like endless waves hitting the shore," he says. "No wave is the same wave as the next but they look the same, a little bit. But things change over time and I think music is just evolving."

Pike is sure to give props to independent metal labels such as High on Fire's current home at Relapse Records and others like Translation Loss and Tee Pee who embrace changes within the genre. "They support bands that are kind of changing stuff as far as our whole metal family goes, or whatever label you want to give it," says Pike. "It definitely starts in the way the labels push [artists]. It's the way that it gets to the people."

As for how he interprets the term "heavy," Pike says, "[It's] technically knowing what your doing but the other part of that, eighty percent of it, is how you convey yourself through your instrument, you know, from the heart and soul. That's what heavy is."

If you want to talk heavy, then look no further than drummer Des Kensel, the colossal foundation of High on Fire whose signature detonating percussion mastery is untouched by most of his contemporaries. Anybody who's witnessed a High On Fire live show knows Kensel's mind is transported to another dimension that allows him to emanate such tremors to the audience.

Continue reading for more on High on Fire...

 
It's like a really spiritual thing for me. It's a release of anger. I'm just expressing myself through my instrument.

-Matt Pike

 
Photo of Matt Pike Dirt Junior

"For me, it's like I'm kind of pissed but having fun. Just look out and get out of my way because for the next 60 minutes I just want to blow you away," says Kensal. "Now, being 34, I've got to prepare myself, mentally and physically, for the hour and fifteen minute workout that I get."

High on Fire by Jason Bergman
Pike considers his inspiration and tells us, "It's like a really spiritual thing for me. It's a release of anger. I'm just expressing myself through my instrument."

The lion's share of Communion's tracks were road tested over six months before High on Fire retreated to Seattle with producer Jack Endino's (Nirvana, Soundgarden) for three weeks to "tighten them all up," according to Kensal. Pike laughs about how Endino encouraged them to "not be lazy," adding, "I think we found a very good chemistry. I've worked with Billy [Anderson] and [Steve] Albini before. I had good chemistry with them but this was something a little different, like he really was into the project he was doing."

"We really try to capture what we sound like live but in the studio, just kind of detail it. Polish it up but get the live, raw grit sound to it [too]," Pike says. "We work on guitar tones really hard, and on how we'd exactly like the drums to sound [as] if we were playing live but polishing it so it sounds like a good record."

High on Fire's Matt Pike
Every good record is made up of good songs, and Death Is This Communion is no exception. Much of the lyrical symbolism pertains to Pike and his bandmates' life of nonstop touring. "Half my life I spend on tour and most of the shit I write is pretty much about my life in some sort of metaphorical way or not. It definitely goes into my playing, and I could say the same for the other guys," he comments.

Prior to and during recording Communion Pike was reading writer David Icke, whose work is riddled with conspiracy theories about who and what manipulates societies, including shape shifting reptilian humanoids that have been roaming and covertly ruling the Earth since the era of Atlantis. Icke is clearly the inspiration behind the sloping guitar fog of "Cyclopian Scape." However, the industrial punk meets Motorhead charge of "Rumors of War" was spawned by America's penchant for fear mongering to justify its actions. "It's very much about the state of our country and how we're starting shit with the rest of the world," points out Pike.

While High on Fire can't quite be labeled as black metal, they still reign supreme to the fans whenever they make a tour stop in Denmark, Norway, or Sweden. "It's really weird," laughs Pike. "All the black metalers and Viking dudes and shit fucking love us. Every time we go to Scandinavia we definitely have seen the crowd get bigger and bigger."

High On Fire will spend the bulk of 2008 on the road bringing the fury to their fans across the globe. While no details have been released for the next album, Pike assures us they'll keep things interesting.

"It's supposed to jar you a little and make you think," says Pike. "It [should] draw you in and make you love the whole record and not just love one song or the hit flavor of the month. I don't write music like that."

High on Fire tour dates available here...

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Comments

ndant703 Wed 2/6/2008 07:01AM
Show -4 Votes Thumbs down! Thumbs up!
Govindaze starstarstarstar Wed 2/6/2008 09:17AM
+3 Votes Thumbs down! Thumbs up!

Thank you Jambase! I personally fucking love these guys. Can not wait to see them live with the new bass player. Thank you for ignoring all the crying about " hey man, that's not a jamband". It's just music folks. Don't be scared! HA!HA!

carlsefni starstarstarstar Wed 2/6/2008 09:42AM
+2 Votes Thumbs down! Thumbs up!

carlsefni

Great article -- I haven't heard the new High on Fire album yet, though reading this certainly makes me want to!

BTW, there is no bad music: only music a given individual likes more or less. Just 'cause I read Jambase doesn't mean I only like the Dead and Phish and stuff -- there's plenty of great music with an improv vibe, and you can sometimes find it in heavy stuff as well ..... (I'm not sure System of a Down are a very apt comparison with High on Fire, but your mileage may vary ;)

kyuss1313 starstarstarstarstar Wed 2/6/2008 09:45AM
+2 Votes Thumbs down! Thumbs up!

kyuss1313

Matt Pike has been one of my faves for years now. KUDOS jambase for spreading the word. HoF are one of the greatest bands this decade, finally getting their just dues. For those who scoff at the riff... grab Sleep's Holy Mountain. changed my life 15 years ago, while I was knee deep in Phish and Dead. "Escape the Sea with ascending motion. I touch the sun and return to ocean..." PIKE F"N RULES!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

All Loving Liberal White Guy Wed 2/6/2008 02:57PM
+1 Votes Thumbs down! Thumbs up!

All Loving Liberal White Guy

Ridant,

All of those themes that you just mentioned in metal are all part of real life and it pisses some people off. So instead of going crazy they vent through it thourgh metal and show it for what it is. We all can't live in a word of magical forests and not work and take molly and mushrooms all day and be all hippity dippity listening to noodling music for hours on end. If you don't like metal than don't listen to it. Like Feist says "I Feel It All" so therefore I listen to all the music that the world has to offer because I'm always hankering different sonic flavors. Oh, and to answer your question, modern day patroitic country is a worse form of music out there.

ndant703 Thu 2/7/2008 06:15AM
0 Votes Thumbs down! Thumbs up!

ndant703

Yes, those themes are a part of real life, but only a part. Dont you think that alot of metal bands overdue it? and it's kinda just an act? You cant be all pissed off and angry all of the time, can you? I do agree with the modern day patriotic country being unlistenable, haha. But carlsefni is correct - Im just not into it, thats all, Im not saying they're bad musicians.

kyuss1313 starstarstarstarstar Thu 2/7/2008 01:52PM
+2 Votes Thumbs down! Thumbs up!

kyuss1313

Just because a guy plays heavy music doesn't mean he's pissed/angry/aggro or any of it. It's the density not the decibals that make the sound. Just like any jam band or any form of truly creative song/riff writing, the expression is the point. Read some lyrics before spouting off that metal=anger. Far from it. I've never seen a frown on Matt Pike's face. He loves what he does, and feels good doing it. Isn't that what playing music is about, heavy or not?!?!

Govindaze Fri 2/8/2008 03:10PM
+2 Votes Thumbs down! Thumbs up!

Well said kyuss1313.( great name by the way. loved those guys too ) Heavy does not equal angry. It can even be deeply psychadelic. High on Fires jamming makes me think of techtonic, mountain building events.

kyuss1313 starstarstarstarstar Tue 2/12/2008 07:41AM
+1 Votes Thumbs down! Thumbs up!

kyuss1313

Govindaze--- check out Mammatus if you want to hear what the earth sounds like when it's hungry or throwing a tsunami at us. Heavy, yes, but far from angry... and yes, HoF makes mountains with their sound...now go further...